Mary’s Gone Crackers’s line of organic crackers now has new Graham Crackers in Classic or Chocolate flavors. USDA Certified Organic, non-GMO, soy- and gluten-free and completely vegan, these Graham Crackers are made with a special blend of tapioca, coconut, rice and other flours, as well as organic chia seeds and quinoa flakes.

East Windsor, NJ—Raw materials maker Sabinsa Corporation has announced the formation of a new division devoted exclusively to animal nutrition.

For years, Vitamin K was the Rodney Dangerfield of vitamins. You can almost picture it sitting around a table with all the other fat-soluble vitamins (like E, A and D), pulling on it’s tie and saying “I don’t get no respect.”

But that was then and this is now.

Washington, D.C.—The U.S. House of Representatives has passed the Designer Anabolic Steroid Control Act (DASCA), an act designed to give the DEA added authority to act when designer anabolic steroids are mismarketed as dietary supplements.

Ronkonkoma, NY—Supplement manufacturer and distributor NBTY has received two Gold level national awards at a ceremony hosted by the Golden Bridge Awards, one for Corporate Social Responsibility Program of the Year and another for Employee Communications Campaign of the Year.

Washington, D.C.—The U.S. House of Representatives has passed the Designer Anabolic Steroid Control Act (DASCA), an act designed to give the DEA added authority to act when designer anabolic steroids are mismarketed as dietary supplements.

Berkeley, CA—Leading natural and organic food company Annie’s Inc., which markets packaged food products like macaroni and cheese under the brand name Annie’s Homegrown, announced it will be bought out by General Mills, Inc. for $46 per share in cash. The total value of the acquisition is around $820 million. Annie’s, known for its smiling bunny logo, became a publically traded company in 2012.

Philadelphia, PA—A new study published in Hepatology shows a heavy increase in liver injury from dietary and herbal supplements, going from 7% to 20% over a 10-year period.

Washington, D.C.—Food companies that aren’t certified organic and that have a form of the word “organic” in their name may be scrutinized more closely, following a rule clarification by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The agency released a notice limiting the ways such companies can display the word “organic” on packages, and instructing organic certifiers to enforce the policy.