We have been discussing bone and artery health with Leon Schurgers, Ph.D. In June, we discussed why vitamin K2 was essential for bone health and in July, we examined why vitamin K2 is also essential for healthy arteries. Both involve keeping calcium in the bones and out of the arteries. Even Time magazine is now reporting that calcified arteries are a major risk factor in heart disease. New research indicates that there is more to the vitamin K2 story. Let’s continue our chat with Dr. Schurgers with a discussion about vitamin K2’s role in brain health.

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Last month, Leon Schurgers. Ph.D., discussed with us why vitamin K2 was essential for bone health. To the surprise of many, studies continue to show that vitamin K2 is also essential for healthy arteries. Even Time magazine is now reporting that calcified arteries are a major risk factor in heart disease. What is the connection? Let’s discuss it with Dr. Schurgers.

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Medical scientists are now realizing the importance of a particular form of vitamin K, the vitamin K2 form. Yes, the general medical community, by and large, still thinks of vitamin K solely in terms of its role in blood clotting, a very important role indeed, but there may be other equally—if not more important—roles that are only recently coming to light.

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Longtime readers may remember that my early longevity research centered on antioxidant synergism and selenium. In 1959, I was researching the possible role of selenium as “Factor 3” proposed by Drs. Klaus Swartz and Calvin Foltz in 1958, when I discovered a synergistic role of selenium and vitamin C. At that time, selenium was not known to be an essential nutrient for humans or other animals. In 1973, Rotruck and colleagues discovered that selenium was a component of an essential enzyme (1) and, in 1989, it was discovered that selenium forms the active site in the amino acid selenocysteine (2), which is now known to be the 21st amino acid specified by our genetic code. In fact, unraveling the mysteries of selenium biochemistry has altered our understanding of the genetic code. We now know that there are at least 20 active biochemicals made in humans that contain selenocysteine as their active site, but we still don’t know many of their functions.

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Recently, an article published in the British Medical Journal attracted a lot of interest because it busts the myth about a decades old dogma (1). Aseem Malhotra, M.D., explained why saturated fat consumption is not a major risk for heart disease, but the common fractured foods and sugar used to replace saturated fats are indeed.

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My wife, Barbara, was raised in a magical mushroom land in southeastern Pennsylvania between Kennett Square and Lancaster. I vividly remember the stimulation of my olfactory system as I drove through the lands neighboring Kaolin where mushroom soils and fertilizers were produced.

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How can parents learn what they need to know about the most common and worrisome issues of infancy and early childhood, including colic, diarrhea, feeding problems, ear infections, colds, flu, fever, allergies and over-the-counter drugs? How can they learn about the nutrients their toddlers need? Much of the information available online and even from “official” sources is questionable. Fortunately, pediatrician Ralph K. Campbell, M.D., and nutritionist/educator Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D., have published a new book that helps address these problems.

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Last month, we began a discussion about the many health benefits of Pycnogenol with Frank Schönlau, Ph.D., scientific director of Horphag Research (distributor of Pycnogenol). He joins us again this month to highlight some more exciting research about how Pycnogenol supports cardiovascular health, women’s health, skincare and more.

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Through the years, there have been many clinical studies demonstrating a plethora of health benefits for Pycnogenol. So many, in fact, that since my first column on the antioxidant properties of Pycnogenol in 1991 (1), I have written six books about the (increasing) health benefits (2–7). Through the years, we have discussed Pycnogenol’s benefits on joints (8), the heart (9, 10), skin, (11), inflammation (12) and more. Now, we know better how Pycnogenol works to bring about these diverse health benefits.

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Last month, Jørn Dyerberg, M.D., Dr. Med. Sc., and I discussed the false report that fish oil intake was shown to be a risk factor in prostate cancer. This month, I will continue discussing this issue with longtime omega-3 expert and co-inventor of the HS-Omega-3 Index test, William Harris, Ph.D. Dr. Harris presents several reasons why we should ignore the inappropriate report and continue eating a diet rich in fatty fish and consuming supplements rich in EPA and DHA for their many health benefits.

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