CRN Survey: 75% of Americans Use Dietary Supplements

Supplement usage remains higher among women, older adults, and those that are more educated and/or have a higher household income. Read on for more findings.

dietary supplement usage survey
Courtesy of CRN

Washington, D.C.—The Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) has revealed initial findings from its 2022. A key takeaway: Supplement usage is back to pre-pandemic levels, with three-quarters of Americans reporting that they use nutritional or dietary supplements.

Breaking down the data on supplement use

  • 49% of supplement users report changing their supplement use since the pandemic began, stable compared to 2021.
  • Two-thirds of supplement users report that they have added new supplements or increased their dose, slightly less than in 2021.
  • Changes in supplement usage have happened across age groups and genders, but declines are more marked among those with lower incomes and among white and Hispanic Americans.
  • Supplement usage remains higher among women, older adults, and those that are more educated and/or have a higher household income.
  • 52% of those who take supplements report taking a specialty supplement (omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, melatonin, and fiber were the most common).
  • 70% report taking a multivitamin in the past 12 months.
  • Sports nutrition supplements are up five points over last year, climbing to 39%.

“This year’s data shows a remarkable picture of continuity and paints the landscape of a vibrant, mainstream industry,” said Brian Wommack, CRN Senior Vice President of Communications, in a press release announcing the findings. “While overall usage is down slightly from its pandemic peak, reported usage of immunity-boosting supplements—including vitamin D, vitamin C, and zinc—is steady from last year.”

Trust in the dietary supplement is high

  • 77% Americans find the industry trustworthy.
  • 84% if supplement users say the industry is trustworthy.

Top motivator for taking dietary supplements

Americans surveyed pointed to:

  • “maintaining my health”
  • “live healthier/adopt healthier habits.”

“This answer is not surprising,” said Wommack. “Data consistently shows supplement users are much more likely to report engaging in healthy behaviors like exercising, eating a balanced diet, visiting their doctor regularly, and regularly getting a good night’s sleep.”

Related: Poll: 70% of Americans More Likely to Support Candidates Who Will Protect Access to Natural Remedies
CRN Spotlights Need to Address Nutrient Gaps to White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health

The complete set of consumer survey data is available for purchase by both CRN members and nonmembers.