Herb of the Month: Tribulus terrestris

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For the longest time, men rarely spoke about their health. It would take a major health issue to address something they may have never spoken about otherwise. That is changing today, either due to the internet providing availability of information, or the possibility that we men are feeling more comfortable, and less intimidated by our sexual health conditions.

In commercials, radio ads, print advertising, or by word of mouth, sexual health and wellbeing for men is being advertised everywhere, and there are many nutrients and herbs that are being used in sexual health formulations. One of my favorites: Tribulus terrestris, also known as goat head weed, puncture vine or Bindi. This plant belongs to the Zygophyllaceae family, and is found in dry climates. It has been used medicinally for centuries, and is even more popular now.

Today Tribulus terrestris is commonly used either singularly, or in blended male enhancement formulations. Tribulus is available in capsules, powders and teas, and dosages vary from 200 mg upward to 1500 mg. In formulations, it is included with other supportive herbal nutrients for even more beneficial results.

A 12-week study in men showed significant improvement in sexual function using Tribulus terrestris, compared with the placebo. It was well tolerated for the treatment of erectile function (1).

And while Tribulus terrestris is commonly used as a supplement for male sexual dysfunction, or erectile problems, it has numerous additional benefits including inflammation, infertility, urinary tract support, and sexual health for women. One randomized study, performed with women with hypoactive sexual desire during their fertile years, found Tribulus terrestris may safely and effectively improve desire (2). Women also have experienced support for menstrual wellness and menstrual health (3).

People have used Tribulus terrestris for years with noticeable benefits, and it can be a safe addition to a supplement regimen. Of course, consumers should always discuss new nutrients with a medical practitioner.

References

(1) Kamenov Z, Fileva S, Kalinov K, Jannini EA. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of Tribulus terrestris in male sexual dysfunction-A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Maturitas. 2017;99:20-6 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28364864

(2) Akhtari, E., Raisi, F., Keshavarz, M. et al. Tribulus terrestris for treatment of sexual dysfunction in women: randomized double-blind placebo – controlled study. DARU J Pharm Sci 22, 40 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1186/2008-2231-22-40

3) Romm, A; Clare, B.; Stansbury, JE; Ryan, L.; Trickey, R.; Lee, L.; and Hywood, AJ; Botanical Medicine for Women’s Health, Page: 97-185 (2010); https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-443-07277-2.00007-6

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